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at markets where there is little talk, air america or other avenues of talk and these stations are often times read it 28, 29, 30, 34th in the marketplace, you can't exist that way. that really drives little snots. they can't admit their ideas failed in the free market place therefore what do they do? they run to daddy, the government -- >> host: daddy, very big daddy. >> guest: very baghdad, and they want -- well, give laissez-faire -- they can't believe that in all diverse america that our point of view doesn't work. we don't accept that. that's even contained in the capper report, center for american progress, again, headed by john podesta. stated in that report. welcome the fact the matter is the free market place where ideas germinate and succeed or fail. and we have to value that. >> host: if the liberal point of view doesn't succeed in talk radio that is just one medium, and that is what they are focused on because it fails there however the left has csn come msnbc, "washington post," "new york times," "boston globe," pretty much every newspaper with the exception of very few in a
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
sally's, stand up, and come follow me. hello, america. i don't know about you, but i have always wanted to be in the mob, and now that i am, it's fantastic! the cocaine, the women, the town hall healthcare protests. i don't remember seeing any of those in those great mob movies, but here's the one thing tonight, this is not a g.o.p. mob or manufactured anger in america. what is happening is negotiating, democrats, republican and independents, senses in their guts that something is not right, and something isn't right with the healthcare plan. the polls reflect that. 65% say obama is taking on too many issues. his approval is at 50%, now worst than bush's was after the first six months. he has fallen 7 points with independents. 52% oppose how he is handling healthcare. 39% approve. more than three out of four think his plan will add to the deficit. that is important. listen to it again. three out of four think this plan will add to the deficit. remember that stat. why the decline? america, i think it's because you know something is wrong when somebody tries to rush you, that's when you n
the campaign is there is no red america, no blue america, no republican, no democrat. there is one america. tonight if what we are hearing is correct, if he says we are going to cling to the public plan no matter what, he is saying blue america wins. i'm the president of that america. this government-run plan doesn't have the support in the middle. that's why he is losing democrat support in the senate and thinking of trying to jam this through quickly with 50 votes. >> roy, do you think this is something they would go ahead with or maybe trying to float this idea to put pressure on everyone to come to some sort of agreement? >> i think that has to be part of it. just today gibbs said they hadn't decided in they were going to stop negotiating with the republicans. kyl said he wasn't going to whip up votes and grassley saying he might not support the thing he was negotiating for. all the signals were there and they weren't sure. when would they be sure? when the support of the american people drop to 29%? this is something they are putting out there as a threat they could pull back. it is a
wanted some legitimacy for their country. america has always said they would only talk to them in six- partyç talks, including our allies. kim jong-il got what he wanted, a former american president. as much as the white house and secretary of state say that there was no quid quo pro, and that president clinton was there on a private mission, -- it may have been a humanitarian issue, but even u.s. officials are telling us that he was given a briefing by cia and others before his visit. he was briefed on the latest with what they were doing, and there is no doubt duringç that three and a half hours with kim jong il, the issue must have come up. jon: is it possible that they held these meetings and did not discuss these issues? >> look at who met bill clinton. the deputy foreign minister who has been in charge of nuclear negotiations. he was very prominent. also, the north koreans, they broktwittered about this visit. they did not give much detail, just saying that president clinton came. the administration is trying their best to decoupled this visit from the nuclear issue. when yo
. this is a great book, singing in a strange land, the black church and the transformation of america. this is one of the great creatures in the history of american rhetoric. aretha franklin, arguably the greatest sound to emerge out of a human vocal cord, reverberating, vibrating, maybe the greatest sound made, some would say others. sam cooke, maybe sam cooke and aretha franklin. but everything franklin, ingenious was nurtured by her father, reverend franklin. i used to listen to this man every night in michigan. if you don't die before you get a chance to hear this man preach, you don't have -- the son sermon in the african-american tradition, of the greatest preachers ever. he ordained jesse jackson. he marched with martin luther king jr. in detroit, where king delivered arguably, even more impressive version of his i have a dream speech in detroit. got to show love to the home town, the crib. skip gates's book was here next to nelson george, where did our love go? nelson george is perhaps the most gifted african-american man of the letters of our time. what can't this guy do? he is a novelist
. this fall, and to the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. the supreme court, coming the first sunday of october on c- span. >> president obama goes back on the road tomorrow to talk about health care. he will be in belgrade, montana, to talk about his plan to overhaul the nation's health- care system. on saturday, the first family plans to spend part of the day in yellowstone. afterward, president obama has to another forum in grand junction, colorado. white house officials have said that the trip is partly aimed at encouraging people to visit national parks, as well as to get out the message on health care. this morning, "washington journal" asked to be worse if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can -- a view is if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can. have the health care protests changed your mind? beginning with a call from sun city, fla. on the independent line. what is your thinking as an independent? caller: thanks for taking my call. it has changed
in essence magazine present black in america, reclaiming the dream, tonight at 8:00 only on cnn. >>> coming up today at 4:00 eastern, we have a special report covering america. what's in it for you. we want to hear your thoughts on health care. and already we are, you're posting your comments on our block at cnn.com/fredricka or my facebook. people ask why are they going bankrupt. your comments and questions 4:00 eastern time. right now, time for "your money." >>> the future of your gas prices, did speculators drive oil prices sky high, and could it happen again. >>> the stock market is on a roll. how you can cash in right now. >>> and all those burgers, fries and burritos add up. we have the real cost of all those calories. >>> get ready, it's time to talk. "your money." i'm ali velshi. >> i'm christine romans. your health care still very much in limbo. >> dana bash has been camped out in the halls of the capital through all of this. she joins us with an update. hi, dana. they're headed out now for summer recess. without either the house or the senate passing health care reform. let's star
's all somehow inevitable and that the only way for america to get ahead is for places like elkhart to be left behind. you hear that argument sometime in washington. but i know and you know that the truth is exactly the opposite. i'm here because i believe our ability to recover and to prosper as a nation depends on what happens in communities just like this one. the battle for america's future will be fought and won in places like elkhart and detroit and goshen and pittsburgh, south bend, youngstown, in cities and towns across indiana and across the midwest and across the country that have been the backbone of america. it will be won by making places like elkhart what they once were and can be again, and that is centers of innovation and entrepreneurship and ingenuity and opportunity. the whirring engines of america. we can't afford to run the race at half strength or half speed. if we hope to lead this century like we did the last century, we have to create the conditions and opportunities for places like elkhart to succeed. we have to harness the potential, the innovative and cr
in america" truly applied to judge sotomayor and i can say that with a special understanding. humble beginnings were the touch stones that enabled each of us to achieve beyond any parents' dream. i grew up in patterson, new jersey, hard scrabble mill town and our family lacked resources but left inheritance of valuabls with no valuables. my parents sought an opportunity in this country to be free and make a living. we were obligated, if we had the opportunity, to make sure we gave something back to the community in which we lived. judge sotomayor's family moved here if puerto rico and she grew up in a housing project where she saw upfront and close the struggles of people living in poor areas. like my father, judge sotomayor's dad died at a very young age and her mother, like mind, became a widow at a very young age. and she became a single mother, like mind. judge sotomayor's mother had to raise her and her brother in the face of available, social, and financial adversity. in fact, her mother worked two jobs to supports her children and despite the many difficulties, judge sotomayor
of house senators say they will vote. coming this fall, tour the home to america's highest court, "the supreme court." >> two journalist are right tom today. they were accompanied by president bill clinton who helped secure their release. they were for -- that were from al gore's current tv network. >> welcome home laura ling and euna lee. [applause] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [laughter] >> 30 an hour seco -- 38 hours ago, euna lee and i were prisoners in north korea. we appeared at any moment that we could be sent to a hard labor camp. and then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting. we were taken to a location and when we walked in -- through the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. we were shocked. but we knew instantly in our hearts that the nightmare of our life was finally coming to an end, and now we stand here and on and free -- home and free. euna and i would like to express our deepest gratitude to president clinton and his wonderful, amazing, not to mention supercool team, including john but as the -- podesta and the un
him a little less busy. he started out bringing health care to the jungles of central america before realize is, hey, maybe there was help desperately needed here in this country. >> stop broan brock is the foun remote area medical, a nonprofit volunteer corps of doctors, nurses and dental professionals. he joins us from knoxville, tennessee. stan, thank you for being with us. what an interesting story. you did this, because you were injured. you were in south america somewhere and you needed medical attention, and it was 26 days on foot to get to a doctor? >> yes, yes, 26 days on foot. and so it makes you think, you know, when you're lying there all smashed up somewhere, and there's no doctor in sight. and of course, that unfortunate is really the case for 49 million americans who might as well be in the amazon jungle for their likelihood of being able to access health care in this country. >> is that really true? if you are injured in this country, it is federal law. you walk into an emergency room and you have to be treated is the law. isn't the issue here that it's costly to have
on the cnn express across america talking to you about your health coverage and what you want to see in reform. ali, what are they telling you? >> reporter: and i'm here in kansas city, missouri, with the cnn express. i've been hearing a lot from people across the country. we've started in georgia, went through tennessee, kentucky, illinois, missouri, and now into kansas and then into iowa. we're finding out what people are feeling about health care. the debate, as we've seen, has been heated in town hall meetings all over the country. when we stopped in paducah, kentucky, i had a very civilized, very normal conversation with some folks about their fears and hopes for health care reform, christine. have a listen to this. >> reporter: we are hearing different things from people wherever we're going but i haven't found too many people around here who are opposed to reforming health care. >> i'm for the idea but i don't think that congress and the president have done a good job of disseminating information. i'm just hearing a lot of talk. >> reporter: what about you? >> i think right no
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
, plus what elvis' doctor faced, later on "good morning america." >>> a panel has issued a worst-case scenario for the spine flu. the virus could infect half of the country this fall and winter. 1.8 million people could be hospitalized. they say the majority of the cases could be mild. but the virus could till up to 90,000 people. as many as 40,000 deaths occur during a typical flu season, mostly the elderly. >>> in greece, a multinational airborne assault, and minor winds have given firefighters the upper hand against fierce wildfires. 19 water-dropping planes from 4 countries battled the largest fire just outside athens. this morning, mor than 1,000 firefighters and soldiers remain on guard against any flare-ups. >>> preliminary results from afghanistan's election are due out this evening. 10% of the vote has been tallied. the candidates have accused each other of voter fraud. fine expects aren't expected until september 3rd. >>> a familiar name has surfaced as a possible contender for new york's next governor. rudy giuliani is considering a run next year. the former new york c
>>> good morning, america. and this morning, stunning, new video of the gym shooter. "gma" uncovers another video of george sodini. this time, at a controversial dating seminar. what does it tell us about the killer? >>> the new swine flu rules. the government releases new guidelines, suggesting three shots this year. but is it safe? >>> a sister's celebration. lisa ling tells us how her sister is coping after months in captivity. and what really happened in north korea. >>> and a triple-play in the park. three of the biggest stars from "american idol" perform live in three of the biggest stars from "american idol" perform live in our summer concert series. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, everyone. alongside chris cuomo, i'm robin roberts. diane is off, on this friday, august 7th. and we continue to learn more about the man who opened fire on an aerobics class earlier this week. >> we have a team of reporters looking into this. insight into him will help going forward. and this is a relationship class. a tough-love tutorial, with him participating. >> this, as t
leading the charge -- the president of the autism society of america. they have been listening to families about these issues and trying to come up with recommendations. i am sure that group would love to have an audience and get some ideas that they have been grappling with. >> you just wrote about standards. someone mentioned that you get all kinds of misinformation. you have been on this telehealth for three years now. when you mention standards, is that what you're talking about? >> absolutely. when we start our treatment program, it is a comprehensive treatment program. unfortunately, families can pop up in the internet search and tiepin -- type in telehealth treatment. i do not see how it is possible to form a true therapeutic bond and go ahead and treat the child. is very disconcerting. you can quarry pretty much anything with autism and related disorders. whether it is some way to repair your car, somebody who can paint your house, it is so sporadic. parents do not have a consistent place to ensure that they're going to receive quality care. i am encouraged that you have folks meet
ç president clinton and the dear leader kim jong il. and later, this will unglue you. bank of america, who you bailed out, just got slapped with a big fine. the question is for what? ay your money being used to pay there are many ifs in your family's life. if your kids can go onward and upward, no matter what. if you get side-lined from work. insuring your family's ifs can be hard to figure out. so metlife removed the guesswork, by combining the most essential insurances, term life and disability, in one surprisingly affordable package. creating a personal safety net that's bursting with guarantees for the if in life. find out how much insurance you need and how affordable it can be at metlife.com cpsfx: chear that?can shaking that's the sound of people saving. saving money, saving time, and saving for the future. regions makes it simple - starting with lifegreen checking and savings - featuring free convenient e-services, up to a $250 annual savings account bonus and a free personal savings review. so make the switch today - and get into the rhythm of saving. regions - it's time to expect mo
. the united states, saying we are responsibility for some of the violence because of america's hunger for drugs and the guns crossing from the united states to mexico. the mexican officials want to actually see some more aid, some money here. it was more than $1 billion that former president bush dedicated to fighting the drug effort. $100 million has been delayed in fighting that effort because some members of congress say there are human rights violations that are taking place inside mexico from its own military. they don't want the funds to flow to mexico until that is resolved. third, it's the economy. they will take a look at what is happening, what is the state of the u.s. economy and the recession because it has such a tremendous impact on the mexican economy as well as the canadian one. don? >> suzanne malveaux traveling with the president throughout this trip and reporting for cnn. >>> the summit is taking place across a backdrop of rising violence. michael ware is in guadalajara and i asked him about that. >> reporter: if you look at the grand scheme of this drug war it is n
, but more for an america that they had left at home and also for a changing america, one that the ford motor company, their employers, their employer, was largely responsible with dispatching. there's something about the amazon when one reads the chronicles of the amazon. the amazon almost induces people to wax philosophically or existentially in a very florid allegory about the enormous nature of the amazon, how it seduces man to impose his will and only to render that will implement. think of verna heard sog's interview in burden of dreams, just the way that people talk about the amazon as this place and the of moral meaning and very florid. there is something about though the men and women that ford sent down, most of them from michigan, a lot of them also from the upper peninsula down to the amazon. they were almost immune or inoculated. they had a certain midwestern stubborn little less that refused to see the amazon in those six essential terms. was actually relief reading about it, but then they would wax nostalgic but again certain nostalgia for receiving in a lost united states. it
. j. o'rourke examined america's love affair with cars which he believes has contributed to its cultural decline. the automotive museum in los angeles hosted this event, it is 45 minutes. >> i want to thank you for coming to this book signing. i am the director of the museum here. earnings is an honor for me personally as well as the museum. .. >> pretty well rounded writer and what i love most about him is his ear refer vans and the way he turns a phrase and honest to god, i twant say it, it's the truth he is by far my favorite author and i have all of his box and the first part of the book it lists all the books he has written and i think 3 or 4 of them are "new york times" best-seller books, and, if you hand read "parliament at wars" or "give war a chance" or "all the trouble in the world" read those books and what is interesting about pj and, interesting in the book, and one of my question to him later, are they going to make a movie about your book, a lot of stuff he talks about, that goes back to the '70s and '80s is as true today as it was then and you keep reading the st
in america. so i would actually make this more small business-friendly than even the blue dogs did. if it was up to me, i'd say anybody with a payroll of less than million dollars or anybody with a number of employees less than 50 is exempt from the mandate. now we're going to take the flier. i see i only have a few minutes left. i'm just -- i have -- since i wrote about this in the book, i feel some -- i think it's okay for me to say this. i'm not pushing this. but it was part of my platform in 2004. [laughter] >> it's slightly revised. [applause] >> if i were going to do this, i actually argue in the book that we really don't need a mandate and i don't think mandates are going to be very popular. because mandating anything with the american people is never very popular which is why it makes me mad while the republicans think about sticking us with the mandates that we have today. [applause] >> but if i could do this any way i wanted to, this is a flier, i'm not lobbying for this. all i care about is the public option. i would give everybody under 25 or 30 medicaid for free. and i
estate market. had no government entity existed when private mortgage capital tried up and 2008, america's housing market would have come to a complete halt throwing out -- throwing our needs the commission into a deeper recession. we need only look at the current status of the if affairs in the commercial and mortgage market to see how different things might be today in the tradition -- if the traditional -- if the traditional regular mortgage market without fannie may and freddie mac. for those reasons realtors believe pure privatisation of the gse is unacceptable. rather, we support a secondary mortgage market model that includes some level of government participation, protect the taxpayers and ensures all creditworthy consumers have reasonable access to affordable mortgage capital. nar is currently conducting research to determine what model for the secondary mortgage market would best achieve these goals. we will share that information with you as soon as it is completed. for now, i would like to briefly outline a set of nine principles that nar's board of directors has adopted and
and happiness belongs to america. that if i am a woman from it all i do not like choice. i enjoy being a muslim woman does not pursue happiness and these were also issues that i responded to when i was writing. >> host: in one of the reviews of the book, they made the argument that perhaps your mother ayyad delusion about herself, about the life she created, the illusion that you got sucked into it in many different ways and became a part of it is a metaphor for the illusion of iran, a country that has an image of itself and what it wishes to be and thinks it is deserving to be bought is constantly underperforming. is that what you had in mind? >> guest: i knew that in writing this book i was also responding to different feelings and emotions about iran about the concept what home is or was. but people who read the book always had insight that you necessarily did not have. i do think that we have an illusion of the past and if like my mother we become frozen and do not have a critical and dynamic conversation with the past we will never leave that past. we can change regimes every ten years and
that united america. after sputnik, we went to pick the moon. ronald reagan rally in the country to end communism. you can think of george bush's cry in 2001 that we would defeat -- lead a global war on terrorism and extremism. it is interesting, the last one, the war on terrorism seems to have lost some of that national feeling. when you do polling, you see people not as invested in the success of afghanistan and iraq and other places where we are fighting were secretly, such as the horn of africa. yet in our strategic interest, clearly fighting terrorism will remain the big issue. he what is the next big national issue? what can president obama defined as the national agenda? he tried very much to make health care that. in the last press conference he said it is intimately tied to your own personal future as an american. but we have not seen americans rally around that idea yet as a national cause. this is something president obama and his allies will try to do. he will try to cast the health care debate as important as going to the moon or defeating communism or terrorism you will se
an alternative energy project. the debate of sonia sotomayor will continue also, young america's foundation host its 31st annual student conference. congress does on healtbreak as healthcare heats up. in "the n.y. times close-" -- clinton secures two pardons from north korea -- that is in "the n.y. times." six months later it says here that obama returns with an approval rating of 56%. he is expected to tout his economic stimulus plan to kill us growth. he will announce manufacturing plants, but officials say there are successes to highlight locally, signaling that the times are getting better. it says that it is great that he can return to committees he cares so much about and see signs of success. i hope that he will go way encouraged, and he should. there are encouraging indicators that the economy is turning around, but the battle is far from over. long term there is reason to be optimistic, but still thousands of unemployed in this county begun until all are back to work, he does not think anyone can say it is all behind. on the phone now is a reporter for elkhart, indiana. what do you expe
? >> yes. boxing was good for me. when i saw joe lewis. and he made my -- it was nazi germany vs. america, the land of the free. and america had won when he knocked out maxmeli. i was 8 years old. and i saw the joy in my mother and ther's faces. it was like the world -- america, running through the streets. it was all that. and i looked at that. as a kid of 8, i go what could i ever do in my life that would make people happy. all around but also my parent, mainly. it gave me inspiration. and so my inspiration from there was to make people happy like that like joe lewis did. and like obama just did. [laughter] tavis: whole lot of people. >> and that was that whole thing but it was that same kind of feeling. but i was 8 years old. soy started boxing and i wanted to be champion. and i fought hard on that. joe lewis was my hero -- idol -- hero. but later on ray robinson became my idol. he feels smooth. he was sharp. and he had more girls. [laughter] >> yeah. and so -- and that was good. oh, man. i went -- win-win situation here. tavis: so one of the ways to get girls is to know how to write a
. i don't quite get that but they do. america is a conservative company with a small c in this way. they all say they want change but they don't want quite as much as they think they want when they get in the ballot box. and so you can't change the system and push everybody in a certain way they don't want to go. so in 2004 i said, you know, let's keep the employer-based system is because i think you need to give the american people the choice and if that's what they want, let them choose that. that's why obama's bill -- i'm such a fan of obama's bill. that's howard dean's version of healthcare, 2004. insure everybody under 30. let everybody else buy into medicare or keep their private insurance if you want. now here's what i like obama's bill. it gets back to choice. we have failed to insure people in this country not just because the insurance companies spend a lot of money with harry and lewis who have endorsed health insurance now. we failed because we tried to make the american people do something they didn't want to do. 80% of the people in this country have insurance. of tho
-- or nationalize health care in america. i don't intend to do anything to allow government bureaucrats to get between you and your doctor. >> senator, please forgive my teleprompter here. i've heard your recent rhetoric about how we want the same thing as obama and health care reform. i disagree on every level. there is nothing in that bill that i would agree to and we have to stop giving ground. >> government isn't the answer, it's a cancer. >> right now, as dan lothian reports, the white house is working hard to stay on message. >> you don't know. you don't know. >> 74 going to be written off because they have cancer. >> why don't they take the health care being forced down our throats. >> you don't trust me? >> there's a lot of debate about the health care debate. some are calling it a mismessage. >> there's a concern that if this misinformation machine continues and the record can't be corrected as the white house would like it to be that it could potentially make it more difficult to get health care reform? >> we'll get -- the debate is dominated by something that's not true, of course.
america and dana lohse, a radio show host and affiliate with the st. louis t.e.a. party coalition. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? has this thing devolved to the point where it's not only unproductive but could be potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it could be dangerous. congress is responsible for sitting tsit i setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for one of the important pieces of legislation of american history. people are reacting to that. they're tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. tired of going to a website and filling out a form e-mail. we're seeing at the town halls, people are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and want to express their concerns about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about this arguments, then? these people are not organized. it's a grassroots movement. these are americans who want to get involved in the process and deeply concerned about health care because it affects each and every one of us so much? >> it's fine to get involved and show up at a t
improvement in the second half. bank of america, travelers, chase, american express, ge were all under pressure. shares of cit said it would file for bankruptcy if it couldn't secure reliable debt financing. we had energy shares weaker as well. oil prices tumbled below $70 a barrel. retail stocks held up well after earnings reports due out later this week, target, wal-mart, the gap all posted gains, so did macy's which releases its quarterly report before tomorrow. >> sharon, thanks. you used to cover the energy beat, you still cover the energy beat carefully. energy stocks are in their own pullback. do you have any thoughts on that. >> we are in this range we've been in. we could see a pull back to mid-60s or $62 a barrel or so. there is this concern are we in a recovery and if so, what does that mean for energy demand? we're not seeing that. we're seeing a lot of increases include supply, and that's what we're expecting tomorrow when the energy department reports. >> they report the energy tomorrow. you bull or bear on energy prices? i hate to put anybody on the spot but you know the
in less than 48 hours. emmett till's execution had touched black hearts. ricans born in america, now saw the end game. white supremacy. nationalism. rage. violence. and ignorant sent us this message from the hellhole of mississippi. now, apartheid america was public news. was state news, was national news, was world news because jet magazine for that week when its convention, the black community nationwide putn muscle, shoes, and resistance. rthshaking was beginning. emmett till's murder helped inflame the movement and march for freedom. may be emmett till took up the memory. she didn't let hiseath become history's forgotten page. in alabama, a woman named rosa parks was quietly readying herself to give backbone to a nati defeat. her active if i heard our introduction to a new movement. martin luther king jr. the united states was in his, hour and his history. 's futube about to be rewritten. that's just a sore section from the book. and in the book -- [applause] >> this picture right here on the left, that's paul roberson. and under it, i write hockey adopted paul rerson and wb devoid a
as they provide their and set. the supreme court, home to america's highest court. >> private donations? >> grants, and stuff like that. >> donations? >> i do not know. >> federally? >> america's cable companies created a c-span as a public service, a private business initiative. no government mandate. no government money. "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now for a discussion of if anything and everything. ron, and lilnda, she is a political correspondent for the christian science monitor -- that is lilnda. so, the obama family goes off for a week of fun. there will begin to run ads in that local market. would you make of this? guest: it shows two things -- the president never truly goes on vacation. he can put on a good show of being at the beach. he does not have to turn on his tv. he can to net this out. president obama is pretty good at controlling what he pays attention to. he manages his own the time. host: here is this headline that obama tackles the health care reformers. he has been trying to do that all week. how is he doing in this critical area? guest: it shows how far
and internal control procedures. the team made attempts to contact the company. bank of america is taking over the servicing of most of the loans. if you recently made payment, the fha said your payment should have been received and transferred to bac home servicing. you can find answers on our website wbaltv.com. just click on i-team. >> coming up, stomach cancer is one of these toughest -- one of the toughest cancers to treat. as your children have back to school, they may be nervous about their first day. how to get them ready for the upcoming school year. >> president obama talks to the veterans of foreign wars about his two wars in iraq and afghanistan. that story is coming up. >> the city works on an abandoned car problem. >> michael jackson was known for his music but he could be known his music but he could be known for something oh yea, well for 6 months, customers get all three: fios tv, internet and phone for just $79.99 a month. oh, all right, see... you're just moving your fingers, aren't you? i gotta cut my nails. (announcer) now get three amazing fios services for the price of t
kennedy will be more and not just in america, but on every continent. megyn: major is live from massachusetts with more. good morning. we expect president obama to speak on the senator's passing. put it in perspective for us. this senator was key to this president's election. >> absolutely, good morning. we are at the oak bluffs elementary school. my camera man is going to move the camera so that you can see that the flag is flying at half staff. they are flying that way at the u.s. capitol, all over martha's vineyard, part of a symbolic tribute to, as you said, a senator, a legislator, someone who left a mark not just on american politics, but on this particular president. you asked about logistics', we expect the president to take the microphone at 9:30, his remarks will be about 10 minutes long, talking about his own personal feelings for senator kennedy and placing his death in the ongoing and raging debate in america on health care. we have seen that ted kennedy was an inspiration to those fighting right now in america for health care reform. the democratic national committ
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for the $20 million people of the negro race right here in america? it is time for the democratic party to take up the cause of health. and as long as i have a voice in the united states senate, it's going to be for that democratic platform plank that provides decent quality of health care. today i formally announce that i am a candidate for president of the united states. thank you very much. good to see you. for all those whose cares have been our concern, the work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. if we become pale, carbon cop pips of the opposition, and try to act like republicans, we will lose and deserve to lose. i don't think i'm too old to be your united states senator. do you? you look so pretty. i think we've been enormously kind of blessed about being close to the sea. all of that means in terms of the child, enjoying it. the solitude and the serenity, and the peace. the work begins anew. the hope rises again. and the dream lives on. >> we will have coverage of the funeral mass for senator kennedy and his burial at arlington natio
economy in the long run. >> long, long run. >> this is america regenerating itself and it does require us to press the reset button and say 70% of our economy is no longer going to be driven by consumer sales. this is bad news in the short run but this is like somebody who is -- >> there are healthy things emerging, like you're saying. but there's this unemployment rate that's not going away. it could actually worsen and when you're unemployed or lesser employed than you were and your neighbor is unemploy, your behaviors will change in ways that are not good for the economy. >> listen to this story. an unemployed new york city woman is suing her college alleging her $70,000 tuition was a waste of money. the 27-year-old says monroe college failed to provide the promised career advice and job leads and she wants her money back. >> you know what she should have done. gone to the university of alabama. great school. look at me. >> these private schools -- >> i come to work whenever i want to come to work. >> just take responsibility for your life. >> jack welch mba. >> very overrateded degree
.vitac.com >>> can't you tell? this make-or-break month for health care reform in america. look at all these town hall meetings going on just today. and some of them happening right now. florida, pennsylvania, senator specter again, montana, and nebraska, also hagerstown, maryland, and that's where senator ben cardin hosts a meeting this hour. we're keeping a close eye on this one. cardin actually got booed and jeered monday at his town hall in towson. and in new jersey, congressman steve rosman hosting that one. and there's a bunch of town halls in iowa. >>> republican senator chuck grassley is hosting four of them today. the second one is wrapping up this hour. the president praised grassley yesterday as a republican that is honestly coming up with a health care reform both parties can live with. he's one of the group of six senators from both parties heavily involved in the negotiations. this event earlier in winterset was pretty civil, but the crowd of 3000-plus wasn't giving the senators any softballs either, take a listen. >> like i said, i'm a dumb, southern iowa red neck, and i see nowher
, middle america rose up against that amnesty against, then cheered sarah palin when she was first appointed. there's a new militancy out there, joe, in the gop. >> i've got to say, mike barnicle, democrats always do this. democrats always will vote ideologically. if you look at barack obama voting against john roberts. clearly qualified to be supreme court justice. we republicans always took pride in the fact that we would grill a democratic nominee but then we would go ahead and, you know, we believed in advise and consent. if that's who the president wanted and they didn't fall short of the mark, we didn't look at ideology. that changed yesterday. and i'm just going to say, just cynically, politically i think republicans could have picked a nominee that wasn't the first hispanic woman to show what pat buchanan calls the new militancy. >> yesterday's vote may be a forerunner, a harbinger of the vote on straight ideological party lines. >> as you might expect president obama led the praise for soug sotomay sotomayor. >> justice, equality, and opportunity are the very ideals that h
and then, you just speak without fear. from new york, good night, america. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute ---www.ncicap.org--- bret: next on "special report" politics without the filter, the president holds a town healthcare event, and pakistan's nuclear program is targeted by extremists. we'll find out what american officials are saying about that. we now know what the government warning about right wing extremists was based on. you may be surprised, and you won't be getting taken for a ride by lawmakers seeking first chas transportation at your imens, at least not this time all that plus the all-stars right here, right now. welcome to washington. i'm bret baier. in engaging with the public over healthcare has been a contact sport for members of congress so far this month. today, president obama stepped up to the microphone in new hampshire. senior white house correspondent major garrett has the story. >> they have lined the streets for president obama. >> no government health healthcare! >> both supporters and
in less than 48 hours. emmett till's execution had touched black hearts. africans born in america now saw the endgame. white supremacy, nationalism, rage, violence, and ignorance sent us its message from the hellhole of mississippi. now artheid was state news, national news, was world news because "jet" magazine for that week, the black community nationwide put on muscle, shoes, and resistance, either-shaking was beginning. emmett till's death held for a movement of march of a nation his mother did not let his death of history's forgotten page. in alabama, a woman named lowsa parks was quietly readying herself to give backbone to a nation of feet. her act of defiance heard our introduction to a new moses, martin luther king, jr.. the united statesas soon to meet his, ours and his future about to be rewritten. that's a short section from the book. and in the book -- [applause] >> this picture right here on the left, that's paul roberson. and this w.b. dubois. and under it i write, haki opted paul robeson and w.b. dubois as his cultural grandfathers. thank you ry much. [applause] >> thank y
with a nuclear option. i think that america is against it. people in town hall meetings have the right to organize just like the left. host: this is an op-ed piece from "the new york times" this morning. "the legal america -- american needs to prepare for an early iraq exit. america's legal relationship with iraq is falling apart. nouri al maliki has announced a referendum next january on the agreement governs u.s. military operations. under the terms, military troops will have to leave the country in january, 2011, nearly one year earlier than planned." lisa, independent line. caller: i feel the same way as that person before who said that we should get out of afghanistan. we should learn from the russians. there is nothing that we can really do in that country. we are just wasting our lives. that is all a half to say. host: democratic line, minnesota. u.s. actions -- u.s. options in afghanistan? caller: we have got to leave. we are doing the same thing we did in iraq, playing these games that look like we are there to protect them. my bottom line is that we talked about spending mone
her nomination. and join us next saturday at 7:00 p.m. eastern for "america and the courts." $ >> she will be the first latino american and only the third woman on the supreme court. you can watch all of the senator's speeches on judge sonia sotomayor and the vote at cspan.org. join us next week for "america and the courts," saturday evenings at 7:00 eastern on c-span. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2008] >> from the chicago public library, this is about an hour and a half. >> and now i think we're ready to begin. good evening, everyone. my name is mary demsey. it's my great pleasure to welcome you to the chicago public library for this very special program, "our histories and our stories. " first let me start by thanking juliana richardson and the history makers and g.g g. choza of roosevelt high school for telling these wonderful stories to us. we're delighted to have them here for this very, very special evening. of course, we're disietded to ee dr. henry lewis gates back here at the chicago hub library with rick hogan. it is an exciting night for us
also get a lot of wrong information. the damage that it did to america's image in the world is something we're still on the way to repairing. >> reporter: senator mccain opposed to the interrogation methods but he says it's a serious mistake on open the investigation because it could harm c.i.a.'s effectiveness. dineian feinstein says she is horrified by what he shas learned but she thinks they should have waited to act on this until they complete their bipartisan review. >> gregg: let's continue the conversation on this rather controversial topic, by welcoming our congressional panel. congressman adams and a republican from tennessee. representative blackburn, could prosecutors closely examine these interrogations, they found no prosecute offenses and one they did prosecute. suddenly you have a political appointee in the in time of eric holder that is reversing the judgment of non-political appointee. does that smack of partisan politics? >> what it smacks of is a pilt of this entire process. when you know this review was made a decision was made. the one infraction was dea
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